Boys Elite Clubs National League (ECNL)

The Boys ECNL is made up of 71 member clubs. This purpose of this league is to support, and give clubs, full freedom in the development of some of their elite level players. It is a collaborative club-based development program that features competition, player identification, and coaching and club development platforms. The Rapids Youth Soccer Club is a part of the Mountain Conference, which is comprised of five other clubs.

The CRYSC Boys ECNL offers placement for 14U, 15U, 16U, 17U, and 18U/19U. ECNL placement involves both regular season conference games and cross-conference events, with qualifying teams advancing to post-season playoffs.

Coming Soon

The Whole-Part-Whole (WPW) philosophy is a learning model used by the Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer Club to achieve our long-term player development initiative. The WPW philosophy was first outlined by Malcolm Knowles in 1973 and is used in many learning situations, both practical and theory based. When added to a well-planned and well-thought out pedagogy, the WPW philosophy puts players in realistic situations, which should always include decision-making elements.

When coaching soccer, WPW can be used in a variety of ways to break down techniques, skills, or tactics. Most commonly the players are taken from practice with high game context to a low one, before returning to the original practice. When possible, it is best to practice the game, or elements of the game, in their entirety. An example of this could occur in a topic such as ‘Defending in the Direct Game Channel’. What do you do if the individuals or units in your squad don’t understand how to defend 1v1 or 2v2? You break it down.

‘Whole’ doesn’t necessarily mean a game. Actually, in this theory, a ‘whole’ practice could be a series of complex skills that can be broken down into more discrete skills. The ‘whole’ element should be as realistic to the game as possible. The coach looks to pull actions or components of the game and break them down into chunks so the players can understand and digest the information. The coach will then pull those elements back together into the game situation.

References: Swanson, R.A. & Law, B. (1993). Whole-part-whole learning model. Performance Improvement Quarterly. 6(1), pp 43-53.

@coachdanwright. Coachdanwright.blogspot.co.uk

In addition to our technical soccer curriculum and teaching philosophy, we aim to represent The Rapids Way in all our programming. The Rapids Way is much more than just what we do and how we do it. It encompasses who we are as a Club, from how we handle our administrative details to how coaches instruct players in training to how our players and families conduct themselves on and off the field. The Club’s mission and vision shape a philosophy, methodology, and culture that provide a framework for us to work in these key areas.

The Rapids Way is defined by the experience each player has from the time they enter the Club to the time they graduate.  From a technical perspective, we focus on establishing an individual foundation before teaching group actions and tactics. This includes the WPW philosophy and long-term development planning. The technical, tactical, physical, and psycho-social pieces of our soccer curriculum come together in the form of a distinct style of play, consistent from our most inexperienced levels to our elite levels in the Club.

The culture we create provides a system of support for all of our young players. We take pride in the professionalism exhibited by our coaching staff, from the way they teach to their demeanor and appearance at sessions and games. Our parents are well informed and respectful on the sidelines, during both games and practices, which in turn creates a fun, safe and enjoyable atmosphere for our players to develop. This is captured in our free-flowing and positive thinking style of play.

We have a saying in the Club, “Prepare your child for the path, not the path for your child.” This is the Rapids Way.

Tryouts

  • When: May 20, 21, 22
  • Where: Dick’s Sporting Goods Park
  • Who: 2006 boys – INVITE ONLY

Preseason Event (2006’s Only)

  • When: July 28-August 1
  • Where: Steamboat Springs, CO
  • Who: All rostered CRYSC Development Academy players

Season Overview

  • Rapids Friendlies (2006 only): First weekend of August
  • Training: 3x per week
  • High School ECNL Kick-arounds: Oct. 14, 21, 28
  • ECNL League Games: Early December through Early April
  • Events: Each team will attend two ECNL events per season

Andrew Kummer
Elite Programming Technical Director
akummer@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
303.399.5858 ext. 215

Morgan Kennedy
Director of Elite Operations
morgan.kennedy@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
303.399.5858 ext. 209

Overview

The Boys ECNL is made up of 71 member clubs. This purpose of this league is to support, and give clubs, full freedom in the development of some of their elite level players. It is a collaborative club-based development program that features competition, player identification, and coaching and club development platforms. The Rapids Youth Soccer Club is a part of the Mountain Conference, which is comprised of five other clubs.

The CRYSC Boys ECNL offers placement for 14U, 15U, 16U, 17U, and 18U/19U. ECNL placement involves both regular season conference games and cross-conference events, with qualifying teams advancing to post-season playoffs.

Curriculum

Coming Soon

Philosophy

The Whole-Part-Whole (WPW) philosophy is a learning model used by the Colorado Rapids Youth Soccer Club to achieve our long-term player development initiative. The WPW philosophy was first outlined by Malcolm Knowles in 1973 and is used in many learning situations, both practical and theory based. When added to a well-planned and well-thought out pedagogy, the WPW philosophy puts players in realistic situations, which should always include decision-making elements.

When coaching soccer, WPW can be used in a variety of ways to break down techniques, skills, or tactics. Most commonly the players are taken from practice with high game context to a low one, before returning to the original practice. When possible, it is best to practice the game, or elements of the game, in their entirety. An example of this could occur in a topic such as ‘Defending in the Direct Game Channel’. What do you do if the individuals or units in your squad don’t understand how to defend 1v1 or 2v2? You break it down.

‘Whole’ doesn’t necessarily mean a game. Actually, in this theory, a ‘whole’ practice could be a series of complex skills that can be broken down into more discrete skills. The ‘whole’ element should be as realistic to the game as possible. The coach looks to pull actions or components of the game and break them down into chunks so the players can understand and digest the information. The coach will then pull those elements back together into the game situation.

References: Swanson, R.A. & Law, B. (1993). Whole-part-whole learning model. Performance Improvement Quarterly. 6(1), pp 43-53.

@coachdanwright. Coachdanwright.blogspot.co.uk

The Rapids Way

In addition to our technical soccer curriculum and teaching philosophy, we aim to represent The Rapids Way in all our programming. The Rapids Way is much more than just what we do and how we do it. It encompasses who we are as a Club, from how we handle our administrative details to how coaches instruct players in training to how our players and families conduct themselves on and off the field. The Club’s mission and vision shape a philosophy, methodology, and culture that provide a framework for us to work in these key areas.

The Rapids Way is defined by the experience each player has from the time they enter the Club to the time they graduate.  From a technical perspective, we focus on establishing an individual foundation before teaching group actions and tactics. This includes the WPW philosophy and long-term development planning. The technical, tactical, physical, and psycho-social pieces of our soccer curriculum come together in the form of a distinct style of play, consistent from our most inexperienced levels to our elite levels in the Club.

The culture we create provides a system of support for all of our young players. We take pride in the professionalism exhibited by our coaching staff, from the way they teach to their demeanor and appearance at sessions and games. Our parents are well informed and respectful on the sidelines, during both games and practices, which in turn creates a fun, safe and enjoyable atmosphere for our players to develop. This is captured in our free-flowing and positive thinking style of play.

We have a saying in the Club, “Prepare your child for the path, not the path for your child.” This is the Rapids Way.

Dates & Deadlines

Tryouts

  • When: May 20, 21, 22
  • Where: Dick’s Sporting Goods Park
  • Who: 2006 boys – INVITE ONLY

Preseason Event (2006’s Only)

  • When: July 28-August 1
  • Where: Steamboat Springs, CO
  • Who: All rostered CRYSC Development Academy players

Season Overview

  • Rapids Friendlies (2006 only): First weekend of August
  • Training: 3x per week
  • High School ECNL Kick-arounds: Oct. 14, 21, 28
  • ECNL League Games: Early December through Early April
  • Events: Each team will attend two ECNL events per season
Contact

Andrew Kummer
Elite Programming Technical Director
akummer@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
303.399.5858 ext. 215

Morgan Kennedy
Director of Elite Operations
morgan.kennedy@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
303.399.5858 ext. 209

Contacts

NameTITLEPHONEEMAIL
Andrew KummerElite Programming Technical Director303.399.5858 ext. 215Akummer@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
Morgan KennedyElite Programming Director303.399.5858 ext. 209Morgan.Kennedy@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
Jeff OleckAssociate Director of Goalkeeping303.399.5858 ext. 207Jeff.Oleck@rapidsyouthsoccer.org
Julie GravesAthletic Trainer303.399.5858 ext. 128Julie.Graves@rapidsyouthsoccer.org