Rapids Pathway

Explaining the Boys Player Pathway

Friday, April 9, 5:30-6:45 PM

Explaining the Girls Player Pathway

Friday, April 9, 6:45-8:00 PM

Having a pathway for every playing member in the club has always been a source of provide for the organization regardless of what level that is. Whether it is the first step towards talent development for a 13 year old girl or it is a 15 year old boy wanting to take up the sport for the first time, the pathway in and out of the club is a vital one that must be constructed with the care and attention that its participants deserve.

Please switch to larger screen to view this content.
Destinations
Front Range In House
9v9
11v11
4v4/5v5/7v7
Soccer Start
Recreation
WPSL RAPIDS
COLLEGE
Champions League
Centennial League
Select Soccer
Competitive
RAPIDS TRAINING CENTERS
Player ID Position Spcific
Player I.D
Futsal
United Futsal
ELITE DEVELOPMENT SQUADS
ECNL
Youth Club Elite
COLORADO RAPIDS
Colorado Switchbacks
Academy
Futures
Colorado Rapids
PLAYER MOVEMENT

What is a Player Development Plan?

A Player Development Plan (PDP) is a framework for how the club serves the needs of its playing members and communicates clearly the strategies that we will use to support their learning throughout the lifespan of their time with us.

Why do CRYSC use a PDP?

Connecting every piece of the club from our Soccer Start program at 3 years old, through until the last kick of a ball for an u19 player before heading to college is a process that makes us strive to understand these complexities better and more importantly take a proactive, long term look at what services and qualities we must provide in order to help these stakeholders realize their potential, regardless of what ‘level’ that may be. 

We are delighted to have this PDP in action at CRYSC in an ever evolving way that allows us to be proactive, responsive and clear in our messages to our coaches in the what, why and how of our player development strategy

A pivotal aspect of the player pathway is the club’s approach to Long Term Player Development (LTPD). This section of the strategic document guides the development services that a club provides to their players throughout the lifespan of the time they spend in the pathway. What type of training is best for what age, how much training at what age, what should be the objective of the program at each age and what do the coaches need to be good at to ensure maximum impact are all key components of an effective LTPD.

Please switch to larger screen to view this content.

Colorado Rapids Youth Club Soccer – Long Term Player Development

  • Win
  • Compete
  • Development
  • strategies
  • Learn the game
  • Move
win - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • win

    Children are learning how their body moves and through support will develop solid foundations in that other skills grow from. E.g. Running, throwing, catching, jumping, skipping and balancing. Emotional responses such as turn-taking, positive and negative responses to their actions and resilience (try and try again) are developed.

compete - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • compete

    Extending all 4 pillars at this stage to challenge the player is key. There is an ‘in-built’ desire to win at a young age, however competing with peers in all areas should be emphasized. Training with a real concentration and intrinsic motivation from the player to improve can make positive strides. Injury prevention should be paid attention to by staff and proper warm-ups / cool downs implemented.

development - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • development

    Focus on more complex tactical scenarios combined with technical proficiency is a focus during this age. PHV is generally affected in males at this age. Power and strength in both sexes can be trained to effective use in this stage and when combined with sound technical and tactical knowledge can be a positive combination.

strategies - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • strategies

    Focus turns to finding solutions to the obstacles presented by the opposition, improving technical proficiency, building confidence, and resilience continue to be developed. The development of successful strategies is key in this ‘golden age of learning’ where repetition and good training habits are formed. Peak Height Velocity (PHV) for females in this age.

learn the gaem - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • learn the game

    Building on physical understanding, the children now learn about the structure of the game and become more familiar with field boundaries and rules as well as evolving their technical abilities that aid their use of the environment. E.g. What skills keep the ball in the field, how to best move with it towards the goal and scoring.

move - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • move

    Children are learning how their body moves and through support will develop solid foundations in that other skills grow from. E.g. Running, throwing, catching, jumping, skipping and balancing. Emotional responses such as turn-taking, positive and negative responses to their actions and resilience (try and try again) are developed.

MOVE (3-5)

Children are learning how their body moves and through support will develop solid foundations that other skills grow from.

LEARN THE GAME (6-8)

Children now learn about the structure of the game evolving their technical abilities that aid their use of the environment.

STRATEGIES (9-12)

In this ‘golden age of learning’ where repetition and good training habits are formed, focus turns to finding solutions to the obstacles presented by the opposition. 

DEVELOPMENT (13-16)

During this age, further focus on more complex tactical scenarios combined with technical proficiency. 

COMPETE (17-18)

At this stage, extending all 4 pillars to challenge the player, emphasis on competing with peers in all areas, and training with a real concentration and intrinsic motivation.

WIN (19+)

Small margins make all the difference and whether that is mindset, tactical, technical performance under pressure or physical endurance, the motivation is to win in the best way possible.

CRYSC have adopted a proven framework for contributing to 4 key pillars of development and so the foundations for our curriculum is based in cultivating the qualities of our members in the following capacities:

 

TECHNICAL

The ability to perform a wide range of skills that manipulate the ball into desired places on the field E.g. Passing, Control, Finishing, Dribbling etc…

TACTICAL

The understanding of scenarios in the game whereby specific movements with or without the ball either individually or as a team function allow positive progress

PHYSICAL

The ability to perform physical actions such as running, stopping, jumping, balancing and coordinating these actions without ‘drop-off’ during the whole term of training or games 

PSYCHO-SOCIAL

The development of mental abilities such as concentration and focus, confidence and empathy as well as being able to communicate reasonably and clearly with others

Adjusting training to focus on the key areas of growth at the appropriate ages will result in the long term development of a more rounded soccer player. Clearly there are many variables in this equation however the CRYSC approach to the curriculum is centered around the players needs;

Overview

Having a pathway for every playing member in the club has always been a source of provide for the organization regardless of what level that is. Whether it is the first step towards talent development for a 13 year old girl or it is a 15 year old boy wanting to take up the sport for the first time, the pathway in and out of the club is a vital one that must be constructed with the care and attention that its participants deserve.

Please switch to larger screen to view this content.
Destinations
Front Range In House
9v9
11v11
4v4/5v5/7v7
Soccer Start
Recreation
WPSL RAPIDS
COLLEGE
Champions League
Centennial League
Select Soccer
Competitive
RAPIDS TRAINING CENTERS
Player ID Position Spcific
Player I.D
Futsal
United Futsal
ELITE DEVELOPMENT SQUADS
ECNL
Youth Club Elite
COLORADO RAPIDS
Colorado Switchbacks
Academy
Futures
Colorado Rapids
PLAYER MOVEMENT
Player Development Plan

What is a Player Development Plan?

A Player Development Plan (PDP) is a framework for how the club serves the needs of its playing members and communicates clearly the strategies that we will use to support their learning throughout the lifespan of their time with us.

Why do CRYSC use a PDP?

Connecting every piece of the club from our Soccer Start program at 3 years old, through until the last kick of a ball for an u19 player before heading to college is a process that makes us strive to understand these complexities better and more importantly take a proactive, long term look at what services and qualities we must provide in order to help these stakeholders realize their potential, regardless of what ‘level’ that may be. 

We are delighted to have this PDP in action at CRYSC in an ever evolving way that allows us to be proactive, responsive and clear in our messages to our coaches in the what, why and how of our player development strategy

Long Term Player Development

A pivotal aspect of the player pathway is the club’s approach to Long Term Player Development (LTPD). This section of the strategic document guides the development services that a club provides to their players throughout the lifespan of the time they spend in the pathway. What type of training is best for what age, how much training at what age, what should be the objective of the program at each age and what do the coaches need to be good at to ensure maximum impact are all key components of an effective LTPD.

Please switch to larger screen to view this content.

Colorado Rapids Youth Club Soccer – Long Term Player Development

  • Win
  • Compete
  • Development
  • strategies
  • Learn the game
  • Move
win - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • win

    Children are learning how their body moves and through support will develop solid foundations in that other skills grow from. E.g. Running, throwing, catching, jumping, skipping and balancing. Emotional responses such as turn-taking, positive and negative responses to their actions and resilience (try and try again) are developed.

compete - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • compete

    Extending all 4 pillars at this stage to challenge the player is key. There is an ‘in-built’ desire to win at a young age, however competing with peers in all areas should be emphasized. Training with a real concentration and intrinsic motivation from the player to improve can make positive strides. Injury prevention should be paid attention to by staff and proper warm-ups / cool downs implemented.

development - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • development

    Focus on more complex tactical scenarios combined with technical proficiency is a focus during this age. PHV is generally affected in males at this age. Power and strength in both sexes can be trained to effective use in this stage and when combined with sound technical and tactical knowledge can be a positive combination.

strategies - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • strategies

    Focus turns to finding solutions to the obstacles presented by the opposition, improving technical proficiency, building confidence, and resilience continue to be developed. The development of successful strategies is key in this ‘golden age of learning’ where repetition and good training habits are formed. Peak Height Velocity (PHV) for females in this age.

learn the gaem - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • learn the game

    Building on physical understanding, the children now learn about the structure of the game and become more familiar with field boundaries and rules as well as evolving their technical abilities that aid their use of the environment. E.g. What skills keep the ball in the field, how to best move with it towards the goal and scoring.

move - long term player pathway - rapids youth
  • move

    Children are learning how their body moves and through support will develop solid foundations in that other skills grow from. E.g. Running, throwing, catching, jumping, skipping and balancing. Emotional responses such as turn-taking, positive and negative responses to their actions and resilience (try and try again) are developed.

MOVE (3-5)

Children are learning how their body moves and through support will develop solid foundations that other skills grow from.

LEARN THE GAME (6-8)

Children now learn about the structure of the game evolving their technical abilities that aid their use of the environment.

STRATEGIES (9-12)

In this ‘golden age of learning’ where repetition and good training habits are formed, focus turns to finding solutions to the obstacles presented by the opposition. 

DEVELOPMENT (13-16)

During this age, further focus on more complex tactical scenarios combined with technical proficiency. 

COMPETE (17-18)

At this stage, extending all 4 pillars to challenge the player, emphasis on competing with peers in all areas, and training with a real concentration and intrinsic motivation.

WIN (19+)

Small margins make all the difference and whether that is mindset, tactical, technical performance under pressure or physical endurance, the motivation is to win in the best way possible.

4 Pillars of Development

CRYSC have adopted a proven framework for contributing to 4 key pillars of development and so the foundations for our curriculum is based in cultivating the qualities of our members in the following capacities:

 

TECHNICAL

The ability to perform a wide range of skills that manipulate the ball into desired places on the field E.g. Passing, Control, Finishing, Dribbling etc…

TACTICAL

The understanding of scenarios in the game whereby specific movements with or without the ball either individually or as a team function allow positive progress

PHYSICAL

The ability to perform physical actions such as running, stopping, jumping, balancing and coordinating these actions without ‘drop-off’ during the whole term of training or games 

PSYCHO-SOCIAL

The development of mental abilities such as concentration and focus, confidence and empathy as well as being able to communicate reasonably and clearly with others

Training Load

Adjusting training to focus on the key areas of growth at the appropriate ages will result in the long term development of a more rounded soccer player. Clearly there are many variables in this equation however the CRYSC approach to the curriculum is centered around the players needs;

Rapids Educate =